BUSINESSES: SAYVILLE -
MAIN STREET, NORTH SIDE

Please click on thumbnail image to view larger image and/or more information

 

Main Street, North Side, # 1 - 25

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


Wilson J. Terry Store, 1900


Main St Looking West, 1930s


Wahn Block & Terry Building

# 1:  In 1849, Wilson J. Terry built the second store in Sayville, a general store on the north-west corner of Main Street and (now) Railroad Avenue which his family continued to operate for about 80 years.  In 1929, Sewell Thornhill, whose drug store was across the street, purchased the property.  In April 1935 the Thornhill Estate moved the Terry store around the corner, lowered it to street level, and it became what is now 22-30 Railroad Avenue.  After an addition was put on the south side of the now Thornhill Building in March 1937,Joseph Fiala moved his paint store here from 199 Railroad where he had opened in 1929.  Charles Rohm's gasoline service station, centered on a building which had reportedly  been  the caddy shack at the defunct Sayville Gold Club, opened  on the corner in late May1935.; it eventually became the (Fiala) Paper Store (wallpaper) and then Pepperberry Patch (gifts) before being demolished in 2006, to make room for the Five Points Cafe. (For more details, please see Fiala's in "Main Street to the Tracks".)

#15 & 19, Terry Building (adjacent lot):  . By 1920 Terry had become a large property owner in the village and in that year acquired the James Wood property just west of the original W. J. Terry store cited above. He moved the Wood Homestead from its center to its southeast corner flush with Main Street, extended the rear of the building, and renovated it to accommodate two stores on the ground floor and offices above.  H.L. Terry & Sons moved into 15 and R.P. Jeschke Hardware into 19.  Terry died in January 1941 but his two sons and his brother, Everett R., who managed their other jewelry store in Islip (acquired 1914) continued the business until 1961. Then, Seymour and David Bialer, who had a  Sports Shop in 19, bought the building, merged the two stores into one, put on a united front, and opened the Sayville Men's Shop in 1963; it closed  December 27, 1999.  The store was then re-divided and has had several other changes of hands in succeeding years. 

#21,23 & 25, Wahn Block:  George Wahn acquired the Sayville Bakery in the Raynor Block from W.E. Goldman in 1920.  On July 15, 1927, he broke ground for a new three-store building next to the Jeschke Hardware Store/Terry Building but did not move in until March 1930; Wahn occupied the western unit, 25; a delicatessen was in the middle, 23; and Frank Walters' shoe shop  21.  Wahn's had a very busy store, in addition to the regular bakery selections offering other special services such as baking Thanksgiving turkeys for their customers. George Wahn died in 1976 and the store later became the Cafe Joelle.

Postcards: Left and center from collection of Sayville Library; Wahn/Terry photo from collection of George E. Spruce

Return to start page

_______________________________________________________________________________

Main Street, North Side, # 31 - 49

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


Dickerson Buildings


Community Trust & Dickerson Buildings

# 31 - 35, Dickerson Buildings: John Prescott (J.P.) Dickerson initiated a real estate and insurance business in his home in 1914.  The homestead, 33, had been built in 1852 by Isaac Newton, his wife's great-great grandfather.  In March 1933, he moved the house back toward Center Street to make room for building two new stores for the James Butler Grocery Company and Kollner  Meat Market, managed by Budd Witte.  The stores were each 15' wide, thus leaving another 35' of frontage where he added the small wooden yellow Dickerson office building, 31, reserving space for construction of a larger building there later.  Passersby could easily view J.P. at his roll-top desk through the front left window.  J.P. died in 1963 and his son and daughter, Charles and Florence, who had worked with him in the business, continued it on for another five years, then retired selling it to A.C. Edwards. "Later" had arrived and the little office was torn down in 1969, replaced by Greaves Stationery Store.  The stores became the Toy and Sports Center and are today's Aegean Cafe.

# 47-49, Community Trust Building: The Bedell House was another old residence said to have been built in 1839, with Wilson J. Terry (see #1) being the first resident. In the 1920s it was occupied by A.C. Edwards and his sisters Belinda and Mrs. George W. Kennedy. In August 1926, it was moved back to Center Street to permit construction of the new Community Trust Company, organized by local men as the Sayville Holding Company with a capital stock of $ 100,000 and a surplus of $ 50,000, all subscribed and paid for. It was a handsome structure, inspiring local confidence, with its burglar-proof steel vault door weighing 20 tons.  The new bank opened with much celebration on January 5, 1927; there were between 800 and 1,000 visitors and first-day deposits totaled $ 209,798.06.  Apparently all went well for the first three years until the financial World changed. Later, apparently on New Years Day 1933, secret negotiations between the Community and Oystermen's National began but public announcement of a merger of the two banks was not made until February 23, 1934.  The merged banks opened as the Oystermen's in its quarters across the street on April 16, 1934. The Community building then remained vacant for five years......Jacob  Strasser had opened a National Five-and-Ten Cent store (he and his brother owned about six in New York and New Jersey) at 6 Main Street on September 1, 1934.  On October 26th, 1939, he signed a contract to buy the abandoned Community Building and relocated his local store there the following spring where it remained until the 1970s.  Presently, it is the home of the Sayville Running Company; recent previous tenants included Violets Blue and Flash in the Pan.

Photos from collection of George E. Spruce

Return to start of page

_______________________________________________________________________________

Main Street, North Side, # 51 - 53

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


51-53 & 47-49 Main St


Old Raynor Block & 51-53


51-53 Coni's Lingerie Inside

# 51-53, Edwards Building:   The moving of the Bedell/Edwards Homestead for the Community Trust building also afforded room for a second new structure between that one and the Post Office; the new building was completed in June 1928.   The A. & P. Grocery chain had opened its first Sayville branch in an existing store in the Aldrich Block on January 16, 1916. Then it opened a store in West Sayville in April 1922 and a second Sayville branch in the Maas building on Railroad Avenue in June 1927; the latter had a short history due to fire.  In June 1928, the first Sayville store moved across the street to the new Edwards Building where it would have more than twice the floor space and opened on June 27.  Here it remained until May 1942 when it moved along Main Street to an even larger store at 91.   

Sam Lempert, who had established a stationery store on the other side of the Post Office in the Raynor Block about 1924 relocated to this bigger store. After the death of his junior partner, his brother Philip Lempert, Sam sold the business to a local couple, Stanley and Sally Greaves, in May 1944. In May 1949, the Greaves purchased both the Edwards and the next door Post Office Building from the Edwards Family (and, in the mid 1950s sold them to James Fallon). They sold their business, Greaves Stationery, to Davis Sausner who built and moved into a new store on the site of the old Dickerson Real Estate Office, 31. In 1975, he, in turn, sold the business to Thomas and Gloria Gamarano.   

In 1981, Ann Morrison remodeled 51-53 and opened Coni's Lingerie which she ran until her retirement in August 1998. Debra Canavan then relocated her ladies clothing shop to the premises.

Photos from collection of Webb N. Morrison

Return to start page

 _______________________________________________________________________________

Main Street, North Side, # 55

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)




Wilson J. Terry House


Excavating for New P.O.


U.S. Post Office


Post Office 1907


Post Office Interior 1907


Post Office Scale

Post Office Scale 1907

# 55, Post Office:   Wilson J. Terry lived on the west corner of Main Street and Gillette Avenue in 1841 when the Post Office Department in Washington formally registered "Sayville" as a postal address.  Mr. Terry was the postmaster at the time and his front hall became the local Post Office.  Patrons wishing to mail a letter brought it there and paid a 10 cent tax.  A carrier on horse-back travelling from Patchogue to Babylon collected the mail early every morning and re-distributed it along the route, connecting with carriers along the way; in the afternoon he followed the same procedure in reverse.  Once a week, he picked up the mail left by the stage from New York City at Babylon and Patchogue and delivered that with his daily mail.  This route was almost abandoned when the Main Line of the Long Island Railroad was opened in 1844; however, Wells Livery and other local men met the challenge and inaugurated a stage line to carry mail and passengers to and from the station at Lakeland (near Ronkonkoma).  In 1868, the South Shore Railroad came to Sayville, bringing the mail from the west directly and from Patchogue (end of line). In 1889 Woodhull Raynor was appointed Postmaster and moved the Post Office to the west end of the new Raynor Block adjacent to his Funeral Parlor where it remained until the new Post Office was built; that opened for business on December 2nd, 1895. Joseph Coglan, a real estate and insurance agent, rented a front room in the building for a newsroom and stationery store. In the photos above, Clara Lawrence Kelly is the girl on the steps, note shoe shine on left; Louis Lafferandre, Postmaster, is at desk, his son Roger at scale and (left to right) are Kelly, Blanche Rogers Lafferandre, and Gertrude Sweet.  On July 23, 1956, much in need of more space, it moved to the east wing of the new Oystermen's Bank at 131 Main and, in 1962,  to its own new building at 130 Greene Avenue.   Past & Presents Gift Shop which for many years had previously been at 6 Main Street later moved into the old Post Office Building.        

All photos and postcard from collection of the Sayville Library

Return to start page

 _______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 59 - 73

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


Raynor's Block about 1890


Raynor's Block about 1915


Raynor's Block about 1930

 


Confectionary

Sayville Oyster & Ice Cream Saloon

 

 

Raynor's Block,  #59 - 73:  Raynor's Block was constructed of shingles and clapboard in 1888,  probably by Woodhull Raynor, an undertaker.  The block consisted of a large building having two stores on the west end and a smaller one having three on the east.  In the top left photo above (from left to right) are a driveway; Woodhull Raynor, Undertaker; Post Office; Overton's Shoes, Hats & Furnishings; Brown Confectionery.  Note water trough, post for horses and wooden stepping block for customers front left.  The center postcard shows the stores, Post Office (a/k/a Bedell Block) and Bedell/Edwards Homestead. The right photo is the same view with the later addition of the Edwards Building. Raynor's horse-drawn hearses were stabled in barns next to stone works, both behind his homestead next door to the west, and monuments were displayed in its front yard.  The Sayville Oyster & Ice Cream Saloon was an early tenant in the east end store (before the new Post Office). In 1927, Woodhull Raynor's son, Lewis W., took over the mortuary business which he moved to a new building at 176 Main Street in 1931. The Raynors continued to be involved in the business for the remainder of the Century and in 1971 moved it again to a much larger building at 245 Main Street in West Sayville. After the Post Office moved to its new home in 1895, a bakery (initially Hauser's, later replaced by Geiger, Goldman, then Wahn) took over the space and a small building was added in the rear for baking.  The second floor of the west end was used for various social functions such as dances and graduations. Early on October 30, 1951, fire destroyed the second floor of the eastern segment of the Block, causing substantial smoke and water damage to Paramount Shoe Repair (61) and Mademoiselle Beauty Salon (63) below; Weeks Radio & TV (69) had only slight smoke damage. More serious consequences had been averted by the lack of wind, the quick arrival of the Fire Department and by recent renovations made by August Kappel, who had purchased the Building the previous year.  Mr. Kappel subsequently decided to shear off the second floor and renovate the first, leaving a one-story modernized business block.  The three eastern stores now house Starbucks (in Lempert's original store), Capozzi & Co. beauty parlor, and The Sweet Gourmet.

Photos from collection of George E. Spruce except 1930 from collection of William Garbarino, Esq.

Return to start page 

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 89 - 95

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


I.G. Terry & W.N. Raynor Homes, about 1938
(note monuments for sale)


Same Main Street Location, about 1948

# 81 -  87:  In 1931, the Raynor Funeral Service had re-located to its own new building at 176 Main Street.  In December 1941 the Woodhull Raynor Estate sold the family homestead and surrounding  property - 95 foot frontage on Main Street extending back to Center Street - to the Concordia-Sayville Corporation for about $ 10,000. The Raynor residence was razed immediately and the Corporation built a new building at a cost of $ 25,000 to $ 30,000, primarily for a new and larger A&P.  The current A&P at 53 Main was closed and moved up the street to its new Supermarket at 91-93 which  opened on May 7, 1942. In September 1973, it moved to its final Sayville location in its new building at 270 Main Street at Benson Avenue; it was replaced there by a CVS.

# 91, Ehrenberg's: Charles B. Ehrenberg, a pharmacist who had opened his drug store at 311 Railroad Avenue in 1931, also closed that shop and moved it to 95 Main Street, the center store (far left, right photo) in the new A&P building, on May 8, 1942.  In 1961, Mr. Ehrenberg retired and his son, Marvin, took over the management; in 1971, he bought the building, including the barber shop (99) and the A& P (91).  When the A&P vacated the property in 1973, after very extensive alterations, he moved his drug business into 91. Later, he built a small store (# 89) in the driveway which separated him from the original Raynor Block; is now occupied by the Sayville Linen Boutique. Ehrenberg's was replaced by the Four Star Home Store.

# 95, Village Gift Shop:  Originally Flanagan's Gift Shop, it opened at 21 (Wahn's Block) in May 1952 and in 1957 was bought by Nicholas Toscano who changed the name. Toscano moved next door  to 19 Main in 1961 and then to 95 in 1963. When he retired in 1975, the shop was acquired by Gloria Korinek who had been with the Toscanos almost from the beginning.  

Photos from the collection of George E. Spruce

Return to start page

 _______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 101 - 103

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


Charlotte Shop, 1970s

# 101-103, Cioffi Building:  Charles Cioffi, who had recently acquired the Morris J. Terry house, had a one-floor, two-store building constructed in his front yard in April 1940.  He moved his Sayville Fruit Market, opened in July 1928 at 60 Main Street, into 103: Harry Bialer's  Sylvia Shop , which had begun in West Sayville in January 1933 and moved to 71 Main Street in Sayville in 1935, moved into the other store at 101.  It featured general merchandise, dry goods and wearing apparel. The Sylvia Shop closed and was replaced Forrest Schroeder's China Bowl restaurant in October 1950.

After being released from the U.S. Army in 1948, Rousseau Isaacson, son of local funeral director R.M. Harry Isaacson, opened his first Charlotte Shoppes at 44 South Main Street, selling ladies dresses, hats and handbags and offering dressmaking and alterations.  In November 1950, he relocated to 21 Main Street in the Wahn Block.  Lastly, he bought the property at 101-103, extensively renovated and doubled the size of the building by expanding both to the north and the west. Additionally, he provided a sizable private parking lot that stretched back to Center Street.  The new, enlarged  Charlotte Shops (sic)  opened on February 27, 1959 and closed in 1996. The property was sold to Genovese Drug Stores which, after more than a year of more renovations, opened for business on March 31, 1998.  Shortly thereafter, the 141 store Genovese chain was sold to J.C. Penney, owners of Eckerd Drug Stores; the local business was re-branded Eckerd in 2003 and again later when Eckerd was split up in 2007, the local outlet became a Rite-Aid.

Photo from a private collection

Return to start page

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 131

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


Oystermen's Bank and New Post Office, 1956

# 131, Oystermen's Bank:  On March 14, 1899, the Bank was organized with a capital of $50,000. Isaac H. Green, Jr. was elected President and Dow Clock, for many years the LIRR station-agent, was appointed cashier.  The Bank opened for business in the east end of the Aldrich Block in May while Charles N. Aldrich, who owned the property, moved the old Village Hall around the corner and the new brick structure was put up.  In February 1900, the Bank moved in to its new 17 x 40 foot quarters on the west side and Frank E. Walters shoes and men's furnishings opened in the eastside corner store.  As the Bank continued to grow, it required more space and at the end of 1918 Walters moved a block down to the east corner of Main and Gillette, permitting Bank expansion.  In 1935, when the Bank and the Community Trust Company merged, it temporarily moved into the Community Trust building while its own was enlarged and remodeled to accommodate the new joint operation.  In 1946, the Bank purchased the lot at 131 Main and almost a decade later constructed and moved into a new building there. The Post Office also relocated from 55 to the east wing of the new Bank building where it remained until 1962. Key Bank acquired the Oystermen's in 1976 but didn't change the name until September 1982 when it formed Key Bank of Long Island.  Later changes included acquisition by Dime Savings Bank in 1988 followed by Washington Mutual in 2001 and Chase/JP Morgan in 2005. (For additional details, please see Main Street , North Side) 

Photos from collection of George E. Spruce

Return to start page

 _______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 153

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original


Green's Block with Bud Cambern atop Reo Pumper, 1928



Charles  & George Norman at the re-built
Hometown Station, 1941


# 153, Green's Block
:  The oldest parts of Green's Block were erected about 1872 by Samuel and Willet Green for their own store.  By the 1890s, this block had expanded  to six stores, a big one on the corner, four smaller ones fronting on Main Street, and several added store room expansions in the rear.  Over the years, tenants included the Green Brothers selling manure,  Cohen selling clothing and groceries, Joseph Marek and V. Suda, merchant tailors, the Suffolk County News, Community Trust Company (awaiting the completion of their building), William Vetere offering Exide Batteries, and the Enterprise Confectionery.  In July 1923, John Batson bought the property and opened a stationery and candy store in the corner unit, also using the property as a storage warehouse for his Suffolk County Candy Company.  Later he added gasoline pumps (apparently, that's when it became "Batson's Corner") and also bought land from I.H. Green on the western side of the avenue where he opened a companion service station.... On March 8, 1930, the Modern Diner (referred to as Sayville's first "dog-wagon") opened on an empty piece of Batson's property, adjacent to his most eastern tenant; it ran north-south or perpendicular to Main Street.  On February 15, 1935, co-owner George Devlopoulos had it moved to the south side, adjacent to the old Fire House, where it could be placed parallel to the street and be "better for business"....On November 11, 1937, an early fire which started in a rear storeroom, destroyed Green's Block.  Batson re-built the service station but ran into serious financial problems less than two years later and vacated the property.  In May 1939, Standard Oil of New York put in Charles & George Norman to run their Home Town Service station. In March 1941, Warren "Cy" Beebe took over and ran it as the Home Port Service Station for many years.  In 1983, the Station was demolished and a new two-story office/retail building was constructed on the site.  The Town Squire was one of its first major tenants, followed by Optika Optical in 1989.  The auxiliary gas station across the avenue, after many years as a gas station, is today the home of Dunkin' Donuts.

Photos: left from collection of George E. Spruce and right from collection of Sayville Library

Return to start page

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 169

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original


G.A. & W.B. Robinson Real Estate (2013)

# 169, G.A. & W.B. Robinson Real Estate:  Dr. George A. Robinson, a Canadian immigrant and prominent local physician  (also see South Main Street), had two sons, George Albert and William B., who in 1926 established a real estate agency. George built the original stucco cottage shown above on the northwest corner of Green and Main. He described it in his advertising as "designed to be substantially constructed, of ample accommodations, and so planned as to provide for a completely equipped place for business...our aim that it be distinctive in its simplicity and creative of its congenial atmosphere...something more than just a place to do business". In its first few years, the Company was heavily involved in the development of areas of the Bourne Estate which were then available to the public.  They were west of Island Hills and the wireless station; were bordered by Sayville, West Sayville and Bohemia; and were referred to as Sayville Heights. Promotion featured lots as low a $7 a front foot along Washington Avenue and lots as low as $1,950 along West Avenue.  Additionally, florists and nurseries became a special target for a "florist center" and greenhouses in a segment where, unharmed by forest fires, Commodore Bourne had conserved tree growth. In October 1929, in the Riviera Park development (former estate of Frank S. Jones on the Bay), the Robinsons fostered the sale of 25 acres comprising almost all of the land west of Handsome Avenue to Green's River between Jones Drive and the Bay with a shore front of 750 feet to Mr. and Mrs. David Shea; Mrs. Shea was Frank Jones' daughter...In March of 1935, the office was moved from the corner to make room for a new Batson gas station on the west side of Green Avenue and placed on the east side of the front walk to the Raynor homestead; a duplicate building was then constructed facing the walk from the west and Gertrude Burns with ladies wear was the first tenant.  George A. Robinson died suddenly in December 1936 and his wife, Lillian Halsey Robinson took over operations. (W.B. was not active in the organization.) She was prominent in many local organizations and was included in the 1968-69 edition of "Who's Who of American Women".  Among her notable transactions, was the February 1947 sale for the New York Herald Tribune Fresh Air Fund of the former Cedarshore Hotel to new operators for $ 125,000, donating part of her commission back to the Fund.  She continued in business until she passed away in July 1973 and her office was moved to the Sayville Grange (where it is shown above).

Photo by Webb N. Morrison (2013)

Return to start page

 

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 201

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


Bohack Store on corner, Jean DePaye Real Estate/Antiques third to left


# 201, Bohack Corner:
Henry C. Bohack, a German immigrant, arrived in the New York in 1882, penniless.  His first employment was in a grocery store at a pay of seven dollars a month.  However, within five years, he was able to buy his own first store on Fulton Street, Brooklyn.  By 1917 he had acquired five which, he said, were "flourishing" and provided him with an annual income of $ 3,000.  Several years earlier, he had begun summering in Sayville.  In 1925, the Bohack Corporation bought the John Hughes property across from St. Lawrence Church for $ 65,000; the land had a 625 frontage on Main Street and stretched from Greeley to Garfield Avenues with a depth of 425 feet. It had been the I.H. Green homestead for many years before Mr. Green had sold it to Mr. Hughes for $ 16,300 on March 5, 1910, when he moved to "Brook Side", his new residence on Brook Street. On June 27th, 1925, the new Bohack opened, one of the "newest and the finest of the chain's 350 stores".  News reports noted that the store was equipped with "the most fixtures for displaying and selling goods the clean way, the Bohack way"; that no ice was used, only cold air which was also furnished to the show counters; that Bohack  roasted its own coffee, baked its own bread, manufactured its own bolognas, and was a direct receiver of its dairy, meat, and poultry products. It also had an adjacent "auto accessory and supply store" that it sold off in 1939.  H.C. died in 1931 but the chain continued as a family operation. Bohack opened a branch at 50 Railroad Avenue in the early 1930s and enlarged the Main Street Store in July 1941. It moved to its 10,000 square foot supermarket in the new shopping center on the eastern corner of Railroad Avenue and Main Street on August 4, 1955 and enlarged that to 14,500 square feet three years later.   Throughout the 1960s the chain purchased several other supermarket companies and in 1965 the family decided to "go public". However, in the recession of the 1970s the Company went against the tide, buying up and opening new stores, some of which closed in a month.  After various stages of bankruptcy, it finally folded on July 13, 1977.  

Postcard from collection of George E. Spruce

Return to start page

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Main Street, North Side, # 205

(buildings numbered by today's numbers; may not agree with original)


Jean DePaye's "Wings of Sayville", 1938


# 205, Jean DePaye:
  Came to the United States as a young Alsatian Frenchman and to Sayville about 1922.  He was primarily engaged in real estate, buying and selling lots and, initially, furnished houses, but also had a secondary interest in sale of antiques. In March 1924, he was noted for establishing a high price for Main Street lots, purchasing one at $ 300 a front foot next to H.L. Terry where he intended to erect a five to seven story building with a theater on the ground floor.  In July 1925, he was instrumental in establishing the Champs Elysees development from Middle Road to the Bay around Edgewater Avenue in Bayport (later known as Silver Seas under a second developer).  By November, DePaye was piloting another, Sayville Boulevard Land Company's Sunrise Heights.  He and his partners, John St. Lawrence and Fred C. Meyer, had taken an option on the former Slater Farm in northeast Sayville for about $ 25,000 - it had been destined to be a golf course but the Sayville Golf Club re-directed its interest to Candee Avenue - and they intended to split it into lots of about 11,000 square feet selling for $ 10 a front foot (except for those facing Montauk Highway, $ 35). As an avid promoter, if potential clients sent in $ 50 with a coupon, it counted as $ 75 on the initial purchase of a lot. Among his later customers, in 1937 he sold the relatively new home of Northam Warren, head of Cutex, at the entrance to Brown's River to Mrs. Emma Delshenen and the peninsula (West Lane) in Riviera Park to Elwell Palmer. Initially, he had worked from his home but in October 1927 he moved his office and his antiques into the Bohack Building (see Bohack picture). At this time, he had taken great interest in flying and for $ 15,000 had purchased an FC-2, a Fairchild cabin monoplane, which he had named/labeled "Wings of Sayville on the Sunrise Trail". He intended to use it to illustrate to potential customers the beauties of not only Long Island but particularly Sayville and he kept it at Pausewang's Airfield. (Reportedly, he had also hoped to later accomplish a non-stop flight to Europe but that never happened.)  In October 1937 he moved his business across the street to 186 in the St. Lawrence Building where it remained. After WWII, DePaye enlisted a younger family friend, Henry Pannenbacker, as associate.  After DePaye's death in October 1948, his wife, Versa Glenn DePaye, took charge of operations until her own death in July 1955.  She was followed by Pannenbacker who carried on for many years.  He died in May 1988.

Photo from the Suffolk County News

Return to start page